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Author Topic: Intel demonstrates modular PC concept  (Read 502 times)

Redaktion

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Intel demonstrates modular PC concept
« on: October 10, 2019, 17:09:21 »
Codenamed "the Element," Intel's modular concept is based on PCIe boards that integrate CPU, RAM, SSD and a variety of connectors. These boards use 16 PCIe lanes and can be combined with other accelerators like GPUs, compute units etc. Furthermore, the CPU, RAM and SSD can be upgraded separately, or the entire module can be swapped for an upgraded one.

https://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-demonstrates-modular-PC-concept.437968.0.html

jeremy

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Re: Intel demonstrates modular PC concept
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2019, 19:42:24 »
This is *less* modular than existing PCs. Even as tech journalists, I expected a lot more from you.

Also, how is this any different than existing SBCs that use a common backplane in, say, a 2-4U server? Sort of like the ones I used to manage back in the Coppermine days? Exact same thing, except the CPU is socketed, not soldered, the RAM is socketed, not soldered (LPDDR4 SO-DIMMs? Stop lying), and sure, it's older. The format has stayed the same, however. Even as they were being made into "blade" servers, and their Ethernet, serial, PS/2 interfaces removed, the idea has always been there.

So what makes this board any different?

Bogdan Solca

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Re: Intel demonstrates modular PC concept
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2019, 09:19:18 »
This is *less* modular than existing PCs. Even as tech journalists, I expected a lot more from you.

Also, how is this any different than existing SBCs that use a common backplane in, say, a 2-4U server? Sort of like the ones I used to manage back in the Coppermine days? Exact same thing, except the CPU is socketed, not soldered, the RAM is socketed, not soldered (LPDDR4 SO-DIMMs? Stop lying), and sure, it's older. The format has stayed the same, however. Even as they were being made into "blade" servers, and their Ethernet, serial, PS/2 interfaces removed, the idea has always been there.

So what makes this board any different?

What do you mean "less" modular? Right now, if you want to upgrade to a new CPU that is not compatible with your motherboard, you need to change the motherboard, the CPU and possibly even the RAM. With Intel's PCIe cards you only need to buy a new PCIe card which installs much easier. Or you just replace the CPU / RAM / SSD on the card itself.

What's different? This is meant for maistream OEM systems, not servers.

 

 
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