Register
Notebookcheck

Autor Thema: The Note 11 or Galaxy S12 may be Samsung's first graphene powered smartphones  (Gelesen 200 mal)

Redaktion

  • Editor
  • High End NB
  • ****
  • Beiträge: 57429
  • Karma: +35/-2
Are you tired of the limited battery capacities of modern smartphones? Well, Samsung has a plan to revolutionise smartphone battery technology as early as next year, according to Evan Blass. Do not hold out for a graphene powered Galaxy S11, but that does leave the throne open to its successors to be crowned the first smartphone with a graphene battery.

https://www.notebookcheck.net/The-Note-11-or-Galaxy-S12-may-be-Samsung-s-first-graphene-powered-smartphones.430272.0.html

jeremy

  • Gast
That's pretty cool! It appears SAIT is an in-house materials R&D lab. I had thought it was a funding source for university research projects, though they probably still do that.

S.Yu

  • Multimedia NB
  • ***
  • Beiträge: 647
  • Karma: +1/-0
Interesting, Huawei made such a big fuss (well half of it was free propaganda by Chinese media) which turned out to be merely using graphene at the terminals, but they don't have a timeline for real graphene batteries yet.
---------
That is, provided this leak is accurate. It may not be real graphene after all.
« Letzte Änderung: August 13, 2019, 23:33:58 von S.Yu »

A

  • Gast
@S.Yu - Reading in detail, what they are doing is as follows. Lithium Ion batteries are made of a cathode(for phones it is usually LCO aka lithium colbalt oxide, for electric cars/storage it is NMC, NCA or LTO in modern EVs). And then a graphite anode with sometimes some silicon.

What graphene ball is, is same lithium ion but change from graphite or graphite/silicon anode to silicon/graphene anode.

So is it a graphene battery? not really. But part of that is because a graphene battery is impossible due to how batteries work in general. At best you might get a full graphene anode.

A graphene supercapacitor though might be possible.

S.Yu

  • Multimedia NB
  • ***
  • Beiträge: 647
  • Karma: +1/-0
@S.Yu - Reading in detail, what they are doing is as follows. Lithium Ion batteries are made of a cathode(for phones it is usually LCO aka lithium colbalt oxide, for electric cars/storage it is NMC, NCA or LTO in modern EVs). And then a graphite anode with sometimes some silicon.

What graphene ball is, is same lithium ion but change from graphite or graphite/silicon anode to silicon/graphene anode.

So is it a graphene battery? not really. But part of that is because a graphene battery is impossible due to how batteries work in general. At best you might get a full graphene anode.

A graphene supercapacitor though might be possible.
I'm aware that the energy storage is ultimately Li ion based but...what you describe seems to be what Huawei already implemented, only their batteries don't charge in half an hour nor are they 40% denser than Samsung's.

A

  • Gast
@S.Yu - LION is a bit more complex than that. It all depends how the battery is made. For example, more silicon in annode makes the battery more energy dense but sacrifices lifespan.

The best way to explain it is like cooking, even with same ingredients, how you structure it and the mix ratio and usage can make a world of difference. So sometimes one can sacrifice improvement in energy density to increase the lifespan so that they can increase the speed it recharges.

Trying to look up Huwaii's case, there were 2 mentions of graphene, one for the energy storage industry where they improved thermal management. And another about a rumored phone where the battery is less energy dense but charges much quicker. There is not much info on the 2nd one since its merely a rumor.

So I found no reference so far of Huwaii doing the same thing, do you have a link?

S.Yu

  • Multimedia NB
  • ***
  • Beiträge: 647
  • Karma: +1/-0
@S.Yu - LION is a bit more complex than that. It all depends how the battery is made. For example, more silicon in annode makes the battery more energy dense but sacrifices lifespan.

The best way to explain it is like cooking, even with same ingredients, how you structure it and the mix ratio and usage can make a world of difference. So sometimes one can sacrifice improvement in energy density to increase the lifespan so that they can increase the speed it recharges.

Trying to look up Huwaii's case, there were 2 mentions of graphene, one for the energy storage industry where they improved thermal management. And another about a rumored phone where the battery is less energy dense but charges much quicker. There is not much info on the 2nd one since its merely a rumor.

So I found no reference so far of Huwaii doing the same thing, do you have a link?
What I said should be your first case on thermal management, I just realized whatever else I read about it (that wasn't in the promotion video) was probably baseless speculation by Chinese media, never mind.

 

 
C 2018 » Impressum     Sprachen: Deutsch | English | Español | Français | Italiano | Nederlands | Polski | Português | Русский | Türkçe | Svenska