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Topic Summary

Posted by: vertigo
« on: October 28, 2020, 22:15:03 »

This time I expected that it will take a RAM of 32 GB,  Looks like I have to wait for one more year to buy the laptop

Considering laptops are still being released with 4GB, and 8GB is standard with 16GB being uncommon and often impossible to get and 32GB being very rare, and the fact things have been moving very slowly in this segment for years, you're probably going to have to wait longer than that. I hope that's not the case, since for me 16GB is the bare minimum and 32GB would be ideal for a laptop, but it's how I see things going.
Posted by: test
« on: October 25, 2020, 03:10:20 »

This time I expected that it will take a RAM of 32 GB,  Looks like I have to wait for one more year to buy the laptop
Posted by: vertigo
« on: October 14, 2020, 21:31:07 »

I can't wait to get my hands on the nano. Looove the track point. Will never live without it.

The only thing keeping me back is the screen resolution and for the moment that it's not available.  Will the resolution be enough?
Compared to xps 13 with 3840 x 2400 it seems a bit poor.

/Nanu Nanu

Depends on what you like. This has a display 1" larger than my SP3 with slightly less vertical resolution, so a bit less DPI, but I'm fine with that. I'm usually fine with 1080, both with my 21" monitor and my projector, and based on my SP3, I'm not sure I'd even notice or like the increased res of the Dell. Plus, battery life is much more important to me, and that high-res screen is going to have a (likely significant) impact on that, and Dell's I've looked at recently have had a lot of complaints about battery life. And the Nano has a pretty small battery, so even with the relatively "low" resolution I have serious doubts that it will fare well in that regard, and I certainly wouldn't want a high-res on something with this small of a battery.

In fact, even if I were to consider this, despite being a clamshell, the battery size is the main thing that would be holding me back. I wish they would just make a 2-in-1 Thinkpad with a modern (Renoir or Tiger Lake) CPU and good battery life, even if that meant making it an extra couple mm thick and ounces heavier for an extra hour or two of runtime. I also really, really like the Trackpoint, and it drives me nuts that despite being one of their most standout features, they only put it on a limited number of models, and those are almost all clamshell. They release different models each with the features I want, but seem insistent on not releasing the one version with them combined.
Posted by: Nino Nana
« on: October 14, 2020, 15:38:23 »

I can't wait to get my hands on the nano. Looove the track point. Will never live without it.

The only thing keeping me back is the screen resolution and for the moment that it's not available.  Will the resolution be enough?
Compared to xps 13 with 3840 x 2400 it seems a bit poor.

/Nanu Nanu
Posted by: frogg
« on: October 02, 2020, 16:21:40 »

145g less than my X1 tablet Gen 1! and much smaller, that's exactly what i was waiting for my next bikepacking adventure.
Linux certification, 16:10 screen ratio, kudos to you Lenovo (and Intel).
I hope it only need a standard multipurpose USB-C charger, not a specific one like for my X1 Tablet. One thing less to carry.

This is the lightest and smallest Linux compatible laptop i could find, with a trackpoint. I'm ready to pay whatever for that. In the bike world there's a saying "Strong, Light, Cheap, pick two".
Posted by: Astar
« on: October 01, 2020, 20:49:59 »

"premium material finish?" Wow, that's hilarious. Would a handsome mahogany finish get your dollar?

For a long time, PC makers used shiny silver plastic parts that served no purpose but to look shiny. Then Apple shook things up with their aluminum designs, that actually had a purpose. But this whole time, Thinkpads strictly made equipment that was form follows function. Lightweight magnesium, for example, and guess what, it's matte black. Lenovo has bent a bit with silver designs, but in general look to Thinkpads for a legacy of excellent material uses in forms exactly dictated by what's required. Look to companies like Asus with their cheesy brushed metal spiral for the opposite.

Wow... look who's being ludicrous! CrApple used aluminium because it is CHEAP, you idiot! And aluminium designs serves no particular purpose other than that. Which is why that fruit company's laptops are always so heavy and hot.

Plastic has always been an excellent albeit underrated material for electronics. Used wisely, a plastic chasis allows many phones and laptops to be very strong and light.

CrApple couldn't and never could compete so they decided to use the cheapest metal they could find and call it premium because they know that stupid consumers like you with no understanding of the periodic table wouldn't know the difference except that it is metal and cold and shiny.
Its so cheap my trash can is made of it and I throw aluminium products away every day, you idiot... from my Coca-cola cans to aluminium foil and wrappers.

PC makers are the ones who really understand material sciences and give consumers what they pay for. Magnesium alloys are far stronger and yet lighter than aluminium, which is why they cost more and are used in REAL PREMIUM electronic products like flagship PC laptops and even professional DSLR/mirrorless cameras. Idiot consumers like you don't even know how heavy your Mac laptops are because they are made of the same cheapo aluminium that my trash can is.

Let's not even bother talking about carbon fibre used in the Lenovo X1 series, cos its obviously beyond your puny brain.
Posted by: _MT_
« on: October 01, 2020, 10:40:31 »

So basically, we have to pay more for 100g less weight and sacrify side screen area to make 16:9 become 16:10. How can shaving out side screen area lead to better productivity? Especially with smaller key keyboard and battery capacity.
For me, personally, since I work primarily with text, height is king. So, as far as display is concerned, Nano is going to be about as good for me as Carbon (or T14). 16:9 14" display isn't wide enough for me anyway to actually have windows side by side. I can only use it for something small like Skype. On the move, i simply use an iPad for PDFs and such as a second screen.

Nano doesn't replace Carbon. It's not even directly above it. They're simply saying that it has as much height as Carbon. If anything, it's sitting "above" X390/ X13. You're getting roughly X13 footprint with a screen as tall as Carbon. That's where the better productivity comes from. Height is important to a lot of people and it's most noticeable in small screens. But yes, if the diagonal stays roughly the same, then switching between 8:5 and 16:9 means exchanging some width for some height. There is no way around it. That's mathematics. If you want both, you need a bigger display.
Posted by: toven
« on: September 30, 2020, 12:31:04 »

So basically, we have to pay more for 100g less weight and sacrify side screen area to make 16:9 become 16:10. How can shaving out side screen area lead to better productivity? Especially with smaller key keyboard and battery capacity.
Posted by: fatpolomanjr
« on: September 30, 2020, 12:18:12 »

RAM difference is because LPDDR vs non-LP. Limitations in max RAM density.

XPS 13 9300 and 9310 have far inferior keyboard compared to Thinkpads, though the trackpoint is more personal preference.

The XPS 13 9300 uses LPDDR4x RAM too, and they offer 32GB. Unless Tiger Lake U processors have a different max ram capacity, there is no reason the X1 Nano should not offer the same.
Posted by: _MT_
« on: September 30, 2020, 11:15:43 »

It has a 13 inch screen. I think what they probably mean is the screen height of 14 inch in a 13 inch chassis - or it is just a mistake.
Yes, they mean the height. Which is due to the different aspect ratios. This thing, because of its 8:5 aspect ratio, has roughly the same height screen as X1 Carbon (or other 14") at 16:9, despite having smaller diagonal. You can see it in the image which I guess is supposed to illustrate it (how much smaller the body is yet the screen heights are practically the same). So, the work space should be narrower, but (roughly) the same height.
Posted by: Benjamin Herzig
« on: September 29, 2020, 20:28:37 »

Personnally for professional use I prefer 14inch... but what is it??
It has a 13 inch screen. I think what they probably mean is the screen height of 14 inch in a 13 inch chassis - or it is just a mistake.
Posted by: Konstantinos
« on: September 29, 2020, 20:15:11 »

On the main article's picture from lenovo it says:

14in display in 13in chassis

In the article it is described as 13 inch. and in the specs table is also described  as 13 inch...

Personnally for professional use I prefer 14inch... but what is it??
Posted by: Hormel
« on: September 29, 2020, 18:17:46 »

I have the latest X1 and had the previous Dell XPS 13 which I gave to my wife. I prefer the Lenovo, the keyboard and touchpad are better. I like the larger screen which matches the size of 2 auxiliary screens I use. Also the Dell gets hot. But it's still a good laptop. It's nice to have so many great ones available the last few years after decades of garbage.
Posted by: vertigo
« on: September 29, 2020, 17:40:55 »

This actually looks like a really nice laptop, though it's a shame they didn't include just one USB-A port, which should be doable with a drop-jaw mechanism. And I'd really like this in a 2-in-1 form factor.
Posted by: davidm
« on: September 29, 2020, 17:35:23 »

"premium material finish?" Wow, that's hilarious. Would a handsome mahogany finish get your dollar?

For a long time, PC makers used shiny silver plastic parts that served no purpose but to look shiny. Then Apple shook things up with their aluminum designs, that actually had a purpose. But this whole time, Thinkpads strictly made equipment that was form follows function. Lightweight magnesium, for example, and guess what, it's matte black. Lenovo has bent a bit with silver designs, but in general look to Thinkpads for a legacy of excellent material uses in forms exactly dictated by what's required. Look to companies like Asus with their cheesy brushed metal spiral for the opposite.

 
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