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Topic Summary

Posted by: TT
« on: June 09, 2020, 00:13:55 »

Hope that the review is on the way :)
Posted by: Mvd
« on: April 27, 2020, 17:12:14 »

Will the t14s silver get the full hd touchscreen option?
Posted by: doa379
« on: March 03, 2020, 10:31:55 »

@Puppy - Lol, the visual acuity distance of someone with 20/20 vision for a 14 inch FHD screen is about 20 inches. The average viewing distance of a laptop is 20-40 inches. You really need to stick your face in your laptop for the difference to matter. Only at 15 inches or above, maybe even 17 inch does UHD start actually mattering.

@william blake - Yeah, the scaling is terrible.

Nonsense. You can alter visual acuity using scaling in the software. But if you're talking about resolving pixel density you can't tell the difference at 20 inches much less 40 inches on a 14" panel. 15 or 17 doesn't much improve the situation. In fact in order to resolve a pixel on my 23" panel I have to be just a few inches from the panel much less 20 inches, and this is on a 23" display.

The display panel size determines the bulk of the overall device. 14", 15.6", 17" are really just random figures that have stuck around for historical reasons thereby resulting in standardization.

I really hope the industry will get rid of that stupid 16:9 ratio at least on productivity devices.
Posted by: jeremy
« on: March 01, 2020, 18:40:13 »

@Puppy - Lol, the visual acuity distance of someone with 20/20 vision for a 14 inch FHD screen is about 20 inches. The average viewing distance of a laptop is 20-40 inches. You really need to stick your face in your laptop for the difference to matter. Only at 15 inches or above, maybe even 17 inch does UHD start actually mattering.

@william blake - Yeah, the scaling is terrible.

I don't have 20/20 vision, nor do I have nearsightedness or farsightedness. I can see a clear difference between 1440p and 1080p on 14" panels (of similar vintage).

I suppose the next question is do I care? Yes, but not for the "extra clarity," rather for dealing with greedy applications. An absurd amount of them require more than 1000px horizontal space (at a minimum). This means I either have to deal with two overlapping applications on the display, or one application will have to give up more horizontal screen space (if it is able to). I just don't get it, do these application developers only have 5k-8k 40+" displays and have never, ever used a 1080p display? Are they self aggrandized to believe the only application I would ever want to run is their junk?






Speaking of panels, though, the previous generation of AMD laptops from Lenovo saw some of them come with Adaptive Sync panels. While the PSREF of that generation never spoke of it, I am curious if this has continued with the new panels?
Posted by: A
« on: February 29, 2020, 23:46:58 »

@Puppy - Lol, the visual acuity distance of someone with 20/20 vision for a 14 inch FHD screen is about 20 inches. The average viewing distance of a laptop is 20-40 inches. You really need to stick your face in your laptop for the difference to matter. Only at 15 inches or above, maybe even 17 inch does UHD start actually mattering.

@william blake - Yeah, the scaling is terrible.
Posted by: Trenzterra
« on: February 29, 2020, 14:20:06 »

Can you get them to confirm TB3 too? :D
Posted by: sharon Wilson
« on: February 29, 2020, 13:20:22 »

I have a Lenovo tablet but want to upgrade to a better one as mine has not got a lot of space,I'm not very good with technology some would like a bit of help
Posted by: Puppy
« on: February 29, 2020, 10:41:13 »

Just out of curiosity, does anyone even care for a UHD screen on a 14 inch laptop?

Yes, FHD is terribly low resolution for a 14" screen
Posted by: william blake
« on: February 29, 2020, 09:08:24 »

Just out of curiosity, does anyone even care for a UHD screen on a 14 inch laptop? I think the 400 nits low power FHD screen is much more enticing.

All UHD does is drain battery life.
in theory, best resolution=infinite or indistinguishable from infinite. but windows and windows software are very bad at scaling. you know, all that interface, fonts, pics, all sucks. also not all internet is good on such high resolution, some places look awful.
Posted by: A
« on: February 29, 2020, 05:51:39 »

Just out of curiosity, does anyone even care for a UHD screen on a 14 inch laptop? I think the 400 nits low power FHD screen is much more enticing.

All UHD does is drain battery life.
Posted by: Thinkpad Fan
« on: February 29, 2020, 02:41:34 »

The gods have blessed us once again. While the lack of two DIMMs is disappointing, this is much less of a sin.
Posted by: Ales K.
« on: February 29, 2020, 00:32:25 »

I was more curious about the TB3, but great work anyways!
Posted by: Yo
« on: February 28, 2020, 22:43:47 »

Would be nice to have confirmation for thunderbolt on ryzen  >:D.
Posted by: william blake
« on: February 28, 2020, 22:04:21 »

good job media guys, this time you've helped us.
Posted by: Redaktion
« on: February 28, 2020, 20:20:23 »

When the Lenovo ThinkPad T14 was announced this week, people were astounded that the Intel version of this ThinkPad laptop was said to feature RJ45 Ethernet and upgradable RAM, while the datasheet of the AMD version featured neither. We asked Lenovo if this was true - and it turns out that the spec-sheet released by Lenovo was wrong.

https://www.notebookcheck.net/Lenovo-ThinkPad-T14-Ryzen-4000-version-does-have-RJ45-upgradable-RAM.454869.0.html

 
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