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Topic Summary

Posted by: ariliquin
« on: February 19, 2020, 10:08:37 »

Far more interesting metric would be AMD's share of successful tenders in this space. 5% of an existing market over 2 years could equate to a much higher % of all new business. What is the new business market share for AMD, I would be surprised if it was not >50%.
Posted by: william blake
« on: February 19, 2020, 03:03:09 »

From your link, on market share ... looks like Intel is doing a decent job at keeping server market share...  could be because of the high percentage of semi-custom work... or perhaps their ability to bundle ssd, 
amd products are far superiour. so corruption and long planning horizon.
Posted by: JayN
« on: February 19, 2020, 00:42:12 »

From your link, on market share ... looks like Intel is doing a decent job at keeping server market share...  could be because of the high percentage of semi-custom work... or perhaps their ability to bundle ssd, 

"The latest report on the server market by DRAMeXchange indicates that Intel's share is down to 98% by now."
Posted by: Redaktion
« on: February 18, 2020, 19:42:58 »


 
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