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Author Topic: Almost two months after the release of Android Pie, pretty much no one is on it yet  (Read 1018 times)

Redaktion

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It's been almost two months since the release of Android Pie and one would expect the latest version of the Android OS to have made its way unto a decent number of devices. Apparently not.


https://www.notebookcheck.net/Almost-two-months-after-the-release-of-Android-Pie-pretty-much-no-one-is-on-it-yet.336448.0.html

Sam Medley

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Are there seriously more people running Gingerbread than there are running Pie? That's insane to think about.

john h bright

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Ale

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It's statements like these which makes people question if tech blogs actually have any understanding of tech or not?

Android is open source, Google releases new versions of android to the public at same time as everyone else. Yes there are dev releases, but that is only for early testing, once everything is finalized, you want a few months for developers to update their apps to make sure everything works properly.

All the devices that have Pie now are bleeding edge devices, not mass consumer devices.

Of course after a few months there are expectations of getting upgrades on new devices, but 2 months is too early, the majority of people do not care to be on the bleeding edge, they just want their apps to work properly.

Ricci Rox

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It's statements like these which makes people question if tech blogs actually have any understanding of tech or not?

Android is open source, Google releases new versions of android to the public at same time as everyone else. Yes there are dev releases, but that is only for early testing, once everything is finalized, you want a few months for developers to update their apps to make sure everything works properly.

All the devices that have Pie now are bleeding edge devices, not mass consumer devices.

Of course after a few months there are expectations of getting upgrades on new devices, but 2 months is too early, the majority of people do not care to be on the bleeding edge, they just want their apps to work properly.

I'm not sure what your point is. You realize OEMs have had Pie builds for months now, right? Developer Previews went public about five months ago, and there's a high chance OEM had Pie builds even before then. Isn't that enough time for development for at least the major flagships?

Not buying it.

heffeque

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I'm not sure what your point is. You realize OEMs have had Pie builds for months now, right? Developer Previews went public about five months ago, and there's a high chance OEM had Pie builds even before then. Isn't that enough time for development for at least the major flagships?

Not buying it.
Was going to respond the same thing.
And to make matters worse, I still see some new phones and tablets being released with Nougat, which just blows my mind.

wolfscape

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The author has no clue. Comparing Android fragmentation to the closed ecosystem of Apple is laughable. The reason for mas delivery of an up to date IOS version is that apple controls all the hardware and software. They know what hardware their software will be implemented on in all instances. Google does not control hardware releases for SAMSUNG, LG, etc... So mass deployment cant happen. I have the Google Pixel 2 XL with Pie running since its release so I'm not trying to come to the aid of apple but please read your own article before you publish.

Ricci Rox

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The author has no clue. Comparing Android fragmentation to the closed ecosystem of Apple is laughable. The reason for mas delivery of an up to date IOS version is that apple controls all the hardware and software. They know what hardware their software will be implemented on in all instances. Google does not control hardware releases for SAMSUNG, LG, etc... So mass deployment cant happen. I have the Google Pixel 2 XL with Pie running since its release so I'm not trying to come to the aid of apple but please read your own article before you publish.

Ah, article author here. Thanks for reading and taking time out to actually write a thoughtful comment.

Sadly, I don't agree with most of what you've said.

Let's establish a few facts here first.

1. OEMs have had Pie builds for months. The first Developer Preview was released in March, and it stands to reason that major OEMs already got builds even before that.
2. A number of OEMs have actually provided stable Pie updates. Essential, for example, sent out the Pie OTA on the same day it was launched. IT IS DOABLE.
3. All relevant devices--that one would expect to get a Pie update around now--launched with Android Oreo and have Treble support.

I like to think the above three points are indubitable, no?

Why, then, is the Pie distribution still so low? Going by the data, there are literally more users on Gingerbread than there are on Pie. You know, Gingerbread, the seven-year-old version of Android? In what world is that even remotely acceptable?

No one is saying all Androids should have gotten the Pie update by now. That'd be stupid. But surely more devices should have? If OnePlus could have Pie available for the OnePlus 6 weeks after it (Pie) was released, what stops bigger companies like Samsung and Huawei from doing the same? Keep in mind that they--within all reason--should have been working on an update for months.

And nowhere in that article was it said that iOS and Android should have similar update distributions.

"In juxtaposition, iOS 12 has made its way to all iPhone models released in the last five years. Of course, the fact that the list of relevant iPhones contains just over a dozen devices helps."

If Apple can develop and send out timely updates to 14 devices, Android OEMs have no excuse for not being able to do the same for one or two flagships.

Plus there's Treble that makes the whole development process easier...

Maybe you shouldn't support mediocrity.

« Last Edit: October 01, 2018, 12:31:16 by Ricci Rox »

 

 
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