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Posted by: Kris
« on: June 18, 2013, 21:23:38 »

There is actually videos where disassembling is possible if anyone was interested! The screws are hidden under the rubber feet, and you just have to take those out to find them.
Posted by: New U410's worse WIFI
« on: November 17, 2012, 17:56:07 »

Despite what one poster wrote about claimed WIFI improvments, a look at Lenovo forums shows that the U410, and hte U310 (which has the same wifi placment, is still abyskmal including for models built in Nov 2012.
I puchased one at the end of Oct 2012 and WIFI was worse than any other Laptop in our entire office. I am not comparing to 1200 macbooks, but to laptops priced form $300 to $700. On the same desk the u410 will see 1/3 of the netorks. On the same desk,  on the same 2.4 N network, at he same distacne the U410 gets 10% of the speeds of other laptops.

Do NOT buy htis from Lenovo, they will not take returns. Tehy will make you send in your days old laptop for several weks repair and you will find as others that the repair does not fix the issue.

If you buy buy it from a store that will take returns with no return fee, and test it immediately. You will find that this laptop looks good on paper but fails severely in reality due to having wifi speeds fro ten years ago.

And one aspect of the review is wrong, they nic card is not gigabit, it is 10/100, which really adds insult to injury.

Ether look elsewhere o plan to have an access point in every single room in your home, and even so, dont even think about 480 youtube or you will tear your hair out.
Posted by: Nickel City
« on: November 04, 2012, 14:04:29 »

I just purchased the i-7, 1 TB (no SSD), version for 699 USD directly from Lenovo's website using a 'weekly deal'.  So, maybe they have a surplus of the higher end model.  At that price, this seems like a steal to me.  BTW, they report a 4+ weeks ship time on the website and talking to customer service, but once purchased the ship time is two days.
Posted by: U410 now fine
« on: August 19, 2012, 20:00:30 »

In the lenovo forum it was reported that the WiFi problem has been solved and all units produced after the 23rd of July 2012 don't have the problem. U410/310 produced be fore can be sent in for service. See:
http://forums.lenovo.com/t5/IdeaPad-Y-U-V-and-Z-series/My-new-u310-gives-really-low-speeds-on-wifi/td-p/790527/page/26
My U410 was made on the 26th of July (label on the Box) and Wifi works fine (reach and speed). Connection to the WLAN took ssome time after booting, After removing the pre-installed McAfee (and replacing it with Avira in my case) there was no more delay in the WLAN connection after booting.
Posted by: Bartosh
« on: August 15, 2012, 15:49:08 »

hi CenturionSlayer
thatnks for the advise. i will defo upgrade mine too. please post the manual.
thanks
Posted by: Jan Andersen
« on: August 07, 2012, 15:43:00 »

I think processor throttling in general is not a Lenovo problem - but a Intel problem. But insisting stuffing in a dedicated graphics card, in a ultrabook design, in a 14" case - should cause any kind of problems, and expected lifte time below 3 years.

Apparently the new Ivy Bridge processors - with 3D transistor technology - runs hotter than last years Sandy Bridge, even they should in theory run cooler. Whether this is cause the faster HD4000 or the new 3D technology, only Intel knows.

I think the Intel Ivy Bridge processors is a flop - the flop of the year - unfortunately, since we which no harm to Intel, just cool ( cooler ) running x86 processors, ( markets has been screaming for a decade to Intel, but they dosnt listen till they recently whoked up and say a tablet market running without them ) and thereby cooler running notebooks, and thereby longer life time, better reliability, longer battery life, less contribution to the global heating and energy consumption.

Also Lenovo seems to be flopping this year - continuing to both stuff unnecessary dedicated graphics cards in, but also continue with glossy screens. Having a G570, i5-2410M, is a pleasure (exept for the very reflecting screen ), which I finally after much seeking found without a dedicated graphics card last year.

Now, we need a cuple more notebooks, but last years Sandy Bride are with refelective screens, this years are not, but running too hot, and difficult to tyrack one down without dedicated graphics card ????? ThinkPad is a bit expensive, and shouldnt be neccesary to buy a ThinkPad to get a matte screen.

However, even in the business line of Lenovo they like to stuff in a dedicated graphics card - in a 14" ?!:-(  For what will a business user need a dedicated graphics card on top of a HD 4000 ?! :(
Posted by: CenturionSlayer
« on: August 07, 2012, 09:11:50 »

Just so people know, this laptop is User Serviceable, simply remove the glued on rubber feet to reveal 4/3(on u410) screws, then remove and pry open using a thin plastic case opener (forget proper name) I replaced the msata SSD with a Mushkin and threw in 16GB of g.skill 1600 1.5v.

There is a repair manual floating about that I will post if others want/need it.
Posted by: Ole Vedel
« on: August 06, 2012, 21:25:32 »

I bought a Lenovo U410 last week. I agree, it is a very nice looking ultrabook and the touchpad is working great, and I did not have any wifi reception problems – but a lot of cpu throttling problems.
The processor was sometimes working very slowly, you could physically feel it – so I installed SiSoftware Sandre Lite ver. 2012.SP4c and tested the processor Dhrystone Integer native (GIPS) . The result was amazing – in the slow “mode” I got a result of 12 GIPS, and in “normal mode” when cpu was running fast the result was 39 GIPS.
The Windows Experience Index was 4.2 for Processor classification, in “slow” mode, and in “normal mode” 6.9 as in your Review.
I did read your review of Lenovo U300, where your conclusion is “However, Lenovo has seriously blundered with the battery's charging electronics: When the battery is being recharged, the CPU throttles to its idle clock rate and unpleasantly slows the UltraBook down for about 1.5 hours. The afterward long battery life can only make up for that to an extent. Because we can't completely rule out a malfunctioning of our test device, we will keep our readers informed about the manufacturer statements on the issue."
For me The U410 still have problems with cpu throttling, can you please give us some more information. I return the U410 yesterday and got the money back – but I was quite happy with it, when it was running normal (fast).
Posted by: Redaktion
« on: August 06, 2012, 14:30:30 »

Aluminum prices are dropping. This statement does not necessarily apply to raw material prices. Lenovo sooner wants to underline its new IdeaPad series with that. So, is investing in an IdeaPad U410 worthwhile for those interested in ultrabooks? Take it or leave it? We scrutinized Lenovo's 14 inch ultrabook.

http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Lenovo-IdeaPad-U410-MAH6MGE-Notebook.79644.0.html

 
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